My Blog

Posts for: February, 2020

By Mansion Street Women's Health, PLLC
February 27, 2020

Did you know that cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer for women worldwide? While this statistic can be startling the good news is that it is one of the most preventable cancers. A cervical cancer screening is one of the best and most reliable tools our OBGYN has to detect cancerous and precancerous cells within the cervix. This screening is most often referred to as a Pap test.

What is a Pap test?

Women as young as 21 years old should start getting routine cervical cancer screenings from their OBGYN. If results from the first Pap smear are normal then women between the ages of 21 to 29 will only need to get a Pap test every three years. Women with an abnormal Pap will require a repeat Pap test to look for the presence of precancerous cells.

Women between the ages of 30 to 65 should get a cervical cancer screening every 5 years. Once a woman reaches 65 years old, she usually won’t need to undergo cervical cancer screenings any longer. Women at high risk for cervical cancer may need to come in more often for screenings. This is something that you can discuss with your gynecologist during your first screening or next annual wellness exam.

Are there other ways to prevent cervical cancer?

Along with getting routine cervical cancer screenings your OBGYN can also provide a way to protect young women from contracting HPV, a common STI that is also the leading cause of cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine is often recommended for young women around the age of 11 or 12.

This vaccine can be administered to women between the ages of 13 and 26 who have not contracted HPV. The vaccine comes in three doses and it protects against the strains of HPV that are most likely to cause cervical cancer. Even if women have received the HPV vaccine they should still come in for routine screenings and checkups.

Whether you want to learn more about the HPV vaccine or you need to schedule your annual checkup and Pap smear, turn to your OBGYN today to take an active interest in your reproductive health.


By Mansion Street Women's Health, PLLC
February 12, 2020
Tags: IUD  

More women in the US than ever before have an IUD, or intrauterine device. IUDs have become a popular birth control method for women because of its “set it and forget it” approach. If you’ve been hearing your girlfriend talking about how much they love their IUD it may have you thinking whether or not this is the right option for you. An OBGYN can answer all of your questions and help you make an informed decision about your family planning needs.

Here’s what you should know about getting an IUD and what to expect when you want it removed,

There are different kinds of IUDs

Your gynecologist will discuss the different options during your consultation. There are a variety of different hormonal (progestin-releasing) IUDs on the market; however, if you experience negative effects from hormonal birth control then non-hormonal birth control such as the Paragard (copper) IUD may be the best option for you.

This copper IUD will prevent pregnancy as soon as it’s placed and it can last up to 10 years. The average lifespan of a hormonal IUD is 3-5 years.

The IUD placement procedure is fast

To get an IUD your gynecologist will place a speculum into the vagina where they will then insert the IUD into the opening of your cervix where it will remain in the uterus. The simple procedure is performed right in your gynecologist’s office and it only takes a couple of minutes to place. You may be instructed to take an over-the-counter pain reliever prior to reduce cramping and a local numbing medication may also be applied to the cervix prior to the insertion.

Every woman will respond differently to getting an IUD. Some women may be able to return to work the very same day while others may need to take some time off. It’s best to err on the side of caution and maybe take the day off work so you can manage any symptoms you may have and just take it easy.

The IUD can be removed anytime

If you decide you do want to get pregnant or you no longer need birth control then you will want to discuss this with your gynecologist. The IUD removal process is simple and involves pulling the thread of the device so it collapses and slides right out. It’s important that you don’t try and remove the IUD on your own; it should always be removed by a qualified medical professional.

Have questions about getting an IUD? Want to find out whether this is the best birth control method for you? Then schedule an appointment with your gynecologist today.